This video from The Daily Show in 2011 is a funny (but, really NOT funny) poke at Canada’s asbestos mining industry. I do not know if Canada is still mining asbestos, but I imagine it is still a concern.

Given the right audience, this video might be a good diversion during an asbestos training for comedic relief.

Caution, some moderately foul language (and “beeps”). For sure PG13+ (if anyone pays attention to those ratings).

The Daily Show, Jon Stewart, “Ored to Death”, by Kristen Wiig 2011 (4:54).

 

I don’t hate all N95 respirators (paper dust masks rated by NIOSH), but they are used wrong very often in construction. And, if you agree, and need another reason to hate them,… guess what??

Now there are FAKE ones! Yes, people have actually copied the crappy dust masks and made even crappier ones.

The fake ones are easy to tell…if you can read the misspelling of NIOSH.  (NIOSH notice here)

kosto-non-approved-mask

You’ve probably heard the Federal silica proposed-rule has moved in it’s next step towards being a promulgated-rule.

And, you’ve hopefully looked at my prior post about the positives and negatives of the rule. I am usually not in favor of more rules, but as a safety person, my overall opinion is the new rule would be good.

However, there is some opposition (EHS Today Summary Article) from a few industry groups and associations, including ARTBANAM, and the ACC in an article to plastic manufacturers. And just recently a lawsuit was filed to stop the rule. They have some good arguments, of which, I think the best are: THERE ARE ALREADY OVEREXPOSURES at the current PEL, and silica related deaths have been in decline for decades.

The ACGIH and NIOSH have been recommending lower airborne limits for years. If you are a construction firm, hopefully you already have (engineering & administrative) controls and respiratory protection in place. If not, the best time to start was yesterday, and the next best time is tomorrow.

cut off saw

 

Sound Level Readings Apps

You’ve probably already seen the sound level apps available on various models of phones and devices. Overall, I’d say they are, “OK“. I would say they’re, “great“, but since I am in a technical field, they actually aren’t that accurate when you figure the amount of error. However, when I consider who might use these: people in the field, I actually think they are, “AWESOME“. It provides an excellent educational tool and a relative-guess as to the noise levels in field conditions. A reading of 95 dBA on your smartphone app, even if it is “inaccurate” isn’t going to be that far off from my certified and calibrated Class II sound level meter. In other words, it will get you close-enough information.

Audiometric Testing Apps

BUT, have you seen the new hearing audiometric testing apps?!  I’m not too sure about these yet. Check out safety awakenings review of these new apps. These are only available on i-devices (ipad, iphone), but their price is worth a look (free & $2.99). The major downside is that these are NOT OSHA approved, so I suppose you would use it as a screening device.  And, in some US states, you must go through specific training to be able to administer the test.

However, there is an “OSHA approved” (I’ve been told, verify yourself please) ipad self-administered audiometric test called, ShoeBox Audiometry, from Canada. They claim their earphones are Class II devices, but you must send these in yearly for recalibration. The portability of this device would be a huge benefit.

Remember to research these on your own before making a decision. Anyone plan on buying audiometric testing equipment for their employees? Or using them now? I’d love to hear your comments.

Old School Portable:

audiometer

If you are in the United States, you have probably been hearing issues with lead (Pb) exposures. The main focus lately has been in Flint, Michigan and their (new) source of water, which contains high levels of the metal. Wiki here.

So, who is to blame?

The NY Times suggests we should blame HUD for the millions of pounds of lead in paint. However, I’m not so sure we can cast all of the blame on them, the legislators, or manufactures. But, we are going to be dealing with lead exposures in the future.

I do not know the depth and extent to which lead poisoning is occurring throughout the US. I’m not sure anyone really does. But, there are MANY sources of lead exposure. For example: leaded gasoline (tetraethyl lead) was used in the past, aviation fuel (av gas low lead) still is, lead in paint, lead in copper pipe solder, lead in fishing weights, lead in ammo, lead in sheet rock, lead in Chineese toys…I could go on.

Bottom line though, if you (or your kids) have elevated lead levels,…there is a source. So, What To Do? Here’s my takeaways:

  • Test you & your kids for their blood lead levels.
    • It is a very established method, but isn’t an exact science. Don’t freak out if they are above “background” levels. Just do what you can.
    • The CDC recently lowered their recommended blood lead threshold to 5 ug/dl of blood.
    • Don’t do chelation therapy, unless the blood lead level is REALLY high. How high? I’m not a doctor.
    • DO eat lots of vegetables and fruit. These have found to lower lead levels the best (but maybe not the fastest).
  • Find the source.
    • Keep looking, there might be more than one. School, work, hobbies, nearby businesses, daily activities.
    • Measure: dirt, water, paint, your workplace.
    • Consider how small an amount is dangerous. 5 micrograms in 1 deciliter of blood. 5 micrograms is 5 millionth of a gram. A fruit fly weighs about 200 micrograms. So, cut a fruit fly into 200 pieces, take 5 of them…you get the idea.
  • Tell others.
    • Recommend that others investigate for themselves.

lead paint

I have given many safety training presentations (as you have, I’m sure). If you are lucky, the owner/president of the company will have a few words to say to the group.  I am sometimes amazed at what they say (or don’t say). Below are my tips and suggestions.

What to say:

  • Thank the employees for working and the contribution they make
  • We take your health & safety VERY seriously
  • Look out for your own safety, AND the safety of others
  • Thank your company safety director/coordinator/consultant
    • Support them and listen to them
    • Do what they ask you to do and pass it along to others
  • We want our employees to:
    • Go home to your friends & family
    • Enjoy your life – injury free. Now, and in the future.

What NOT to say:

  • We spend a lot of  money on safety
    • “Bob got his hand cut, and it cost us $1,200”
    • “We had to pay $1,200 in OSHA citations”
  • Don’t be stupid”  (thereby implying that accidents are generated from stupid people)
  • Our insurance costs are high because you are getting hurt.
  • I will give you ____ if you don’t get hurt (thereby encouraging under-reporting of injuries)

 

It’s probably not a new disease, but there are more cases being discovered for type of cancer called, peritoneal mesothelioma. This cancer is found in the stomach, and is cause from eating asbestos (probably not on purpose, but through the body’s normal ability to capture particulates). They are calling this cancer the “third wave”, in addition to asbestosis and mesothelioma (in lungs).

The Center for Public Integrity released a video and article on a dramatic case, Kris Penny, on Dec 17, 2015. NPR picked it up and posted it here. Hopefully more people will be aware of this type of cancer and it can be better reported/diagnosed.

In a related article, from Newser, they suppose this type of cancer is from home exposures, rather than occupational. This information was based upon Australia’s Asbestos Safety & Eradication Agency‘s 2015 report.  They claim:

  • 40.64% (568) of people had exposures from non-occupational exposures (they are self reporting for the Australian registry).
  • 20% (280) of all registration of exposure were women.
  • 62.6% (876) of reported exposures were under the age of 49
  • The “third wave” of asbestos exposures will be from DIYs

 

asbestos reports

Unfortunately new exposures are still occuring, especially in developing countries. There is an effort to stop asbestos use in these countries, and you can join one group, Global Alliance Against Asbestos.

OSHA has recently announced the final time frame for the proposed silica rule. February 1, 2015 is their anticipated rule promulgation. However, we will see if anyone protests this new information, and if the date for final rule “sticks”.

AIHA broke the news (at least to me) and you can see their summary here. If this is the first you’ve heard about this new rule, then it’s time to do some research, and I might recommend starting here. There are quite a few new requirements, including a lower permissible exposure limit (PEL).

dust exposure

There are pieces of equipment used in construction which are VERY difficult to control their noise generation; open cabs of equipment, drilling machines, impact drivers/drills, and some mechanical devices are the first to come to mind.

Modifying equipment to control the noise is better than handing out ear plugs. But, before you modify the equipment, does your company have a “Buy Quiet” program? NIOSH & CPWR released some info graphics which can help start you down this road to considering noise levels when purchasing new equipment.

Before modifying equipment to control noise consider:

  • Does the manufacturer have a “factory approved” modification already available?
  • Are there any liability considerations if you make this change?
  • Have you discussed the modifications with:
    • The manufacturer? Engineers?
    • Operator?
    • Mechanics?
    • Scope of work?
  • How much noise reduction are you hoping to achieve?
    • remember noise is logarithmic, so a reduction of  1 dB is achieving a lot…
    • but not much practical difference in regards to operations
  • Measure noise before and after, both static and dynamic

noise engineering control

“Do I need a bloodborne pathogens (BBP) program for my construction company?”

Of course, the answer depends, . But, OSHA does have a letter of interpretation.bloodborne kit

The basics are: do your employees have DAILY exposure (anticipated exposure) to blood, or blood containing substances? Further defined as; “today we are going to pick up these bloody needles. Or, “this afternoon we are going into this live sewer, which is coming from the treatment plant”.

Here is OSHA Bloodborne construction letter of interp, but interpret the letter of interpretation yourself. 🙂

“…while the bloodborne pathogens standard does not apply to construction work, as defined in 29 CFR 1910.12(b), it does apply to employees performing maintenance activities who experience occupational exposure to blood or other potentially infectious materials. OSHA expects the construction employer performing maintenance activities to take the following precautions as required by the following referenced standards: Section 29 CFR 1926.21(b)(2) requires that the employer instruct each employee in the recognition and avoidance of unsafe condition…”

In summary, most construction firms do NOT need a full blown bloodborne pathogen program. However, you should still train your employees on the hazards they might incur. This might include the hazards of bloodborne pathogens. There may be a time and project where they wished they had the training.

 

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